Adam Henson’s Cotswold Farm Park

Anyone who watches Countryfile on a Sunday evening will be familiar with farmer Adam Henson and his beautiful rare breeds farm in the Cotswolds. We recently discovered that it’s practically on our doorstep, so we spent a sunny day off a couple of weeks ago visiting the farm while it’s in the midst of lambing season. It’s not much further along the Cotswold Edge than Broadway Tower, and you get there along an old Roman road called Buckle Street. I don’t have much time to write this, as I’m snowed under with work, so I thought I’d mostly just leave the pictures to do the talking for this post. After all, cute baby animals don’t really need much of a description… Enjoy!

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There’s a whole barn full of animals that you can stroke or hold. They even do regular sessions where you can bottle-feed the lambs, though we’d just missed one when we arrived!

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You can go on a free ‘tractor safari’ around the farm, which is really interesting. You learn all about the farm and the many rare breeds that call it home. We also learned that (some say) the term “Cotswolds” comes from the area’s long history of sheep farming, which dates back to the Romans and maybe further, if I recall correctly. Our guide told us that ‘cot’ was a sheep pen, and ‘wold’ the rolling hills.

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You can also walk right the way round the enclosures on foot, and we bought some animal feed so that we could feed the goats and sheep. (One bag was definitely enough, and you can buy it at the entrance with your ticket.)

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When we’d finished at the farm, we drove to the airfield and decided to go flying and spot the farm from the air. You can see the perimeter track, where we went on the tractor safari, very clearly!

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Adult tickets cost £10.50 and you can find out more on the website. We were pretty much the only ones there without kids, even on a weekday, but it’s worth putting up with all the horrid kids everywhere to see the lambs and all the other lovely animals. They should designate a day a week for grown-ups only… adults love baby animals just as much as kids do, after all. :)

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